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Dell Venue 8 Pro full review - Software ergonomics: Windows Modern UI (codenamed "Metro") - IT tutorials, reviews and articles
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DELL VENUE 8 PRO FULL REVIEW

A full 8-inch Windows 8.1 tablet with active stylus for less than 14 ounces

By Maxime Abbey - First published on 04-13-2014 on Arachnosoft

Introduction and buyer's background
Technical specifications
Build quality, design, dimensions
Software ergonomics: Introduction
Software ergonomics: Windows Modern UI (codenamed "Metro")

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Modern UI Home screen, Windows Store applications

The highly-contrasted and bright screen of the Dell Venue 8 Pro enlightens Windows 8's home screen, and its famous colored tiles: the rendering on screen is very sharp, with smooth fonts, and so are fullscreen images from some applications like Bing Food & Drink.

Dell Venue 8 Pro full review - Software ergonomics: Windows Modern UI (codenamed "Metro")

Dell Venue 8 Pro full review - Software ergonomics: Windows Modern UI (codenamed "Metro")

The display defaults to three rows of tiles (or three columns in Portrait mode), which can sound rather pessimistic on a 800-pixel height (or width in Portrait mode) screen: it seems that there would be enough space to fit an additional 4th row of tiles, but it seems that Microsoft didn't choose this path, because, even with the "Show more tiles" option available on the Settings > Home Screen tiles menu, it leads to 4 rows of tiles... within roughly the same space!

Dell Venue 8 Pro full review - Software ergonomics: Windows Modern UI (codenamed "Metro")

You can workaround these choices, and tuneup the number and size of the tiles you're showing on the screen, by tweaking some settings on the Windows Registry, or more easily, by using an application like Metro Scaler.

The overall Windows 8 experience, which often seems rather imperfect on a non-touch enabled PC, feels great on tablet devices, and most of the "gestures" soon become intuitive: scrolling with the finger from the left side swaps from an application to another, a swipe from the top border closes the active application, and a swipe from the bottom leads to the application's contextual menu, similar to what you'd expect using the "Menu" button on an Android device.

At least, a swipe with the finger from the right-hand side of the screen gives access to the famous "Charms bar", which offers search features, links to devices and main system settings, replacing, most of the time, the classical Start menu, except to access all the installed applications, which you can reach by scrolling the tiles from the Home screen to the top.

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Software ergonomics: Windows Classical Desktop
Hardware design: physical buttons
Hardware design: the connectors
The hardware: display/screen, ambient light sensor, gyroscope...
The hardware: performance/CPU/RAM, responsiveness
The hardware: internal and external storage
The hardware: graphics and gaming
The hardware: Photo, video and audio
The hardware: wireless networking
The hardware: battery life and cooling
Extended features - Wireless video display on external monitor (Miracast)
Extended features - The active digitizer/stylus: description and design
Extended features - The active digitizer/stylus: technical review
Conclusion, pros and cons

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